NHS Supply Chain launches new Sustainable Development Strategy

28-Oct-2013

Increased focus on sustainability across operational and procurement activity within the NHS

NHS Supply Chain has this week launched its new Sustainable Development Strategy , setting out plans for improved procurement over the next three years.

Covering 2013-2016, the document has been developed in response to the increasing focus on sustainability across operational and procurement activity within the NHS.

The strategy follows the recent NHS Sustainable Development Unit’s (SDU) consultation, A Sustainable Development Strategy for the Health, Public Health and Social Care System. The NHS SDU is due to launch its overarching strategy early next year.

Sustainable activities such as reducing packaging and carbon can deliver significant financial benefits to trusts as well in terms of reduced supplier costs and fuel usage. It’s these hidden costs that can really add up

NHS Supply Chain’s strategy focuses on five key themes designed to build sustainable development across its own operations and procurement activity to benefit the NHS – carbon, community, ethics and responsibility, natural resources and waste. These will be supported through a strong delivery programme of activity to deliver change and improve how sustainability is embedded into everyday business activity.

“Our Sustainable Development Strategy builds on our already strong track record across the sustainability arena”, said Colin Stuart, sustainable operations manager, who, together with ethical and sustainability manager, Steph Gibney, has led the development of the document.

“Since 2007, we’ve worked closely with the NHS Business Services Authority and the Department of Health to build a solid sustainability agenda, such as driving efficiencies across our distribution network, the introduction of a more ethical approach to procurement, support of the Government Buying Standards for food and catering services, and the development of food framework agreements that have sustainable credentials built into the evaluation process.”

Since 2008, NHS Supply Chain has delivered a 14% reduction in carbon emissions, reduced energy consumption across its supply chain network by 18%, and achieved a recycling rate of 71% from business waste. The business has also taken the lead in a number of sustainable initiatives, including the trial of a new fleet of hybrid vehicles across its delivery network, saving 452 tonnes of CO2 emissions annually – the equivalent of taking two million car miles off the road.

“We know that, with the focus on delivering cost efficiencies, sustainability often falls down the agenda when it comes to trust procurement activity. However, by creating a more-sustainable supply chain, not only are we securing the future; we’re also managing risk,” said Stuart.

Our strategy is not about leaping into the unknown. It’s about taking steps to continually improve by building on our existing achievements to benefit our customers

“Sustainable activities such as reducing packaging and carbon can deliver significant financial benefits to trusts as well in terms of reduced supplier costs and fuel usage. It’s these hidden costs that can really add up. By improving sustainability across the supply chain, we can pass these benefits onto customers.”

Activities outlined in the new strategy include increasing transport efficiency by reducing CO2 emissions from delivery vehicles by 2.5% year on year; increasing the energy efficiency of the business’ network of regional distribution centres by 2.5% year on year; and reducing waste generation by increasing recycling opportunities with both suppliers and NHS customers.

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“Some of the programmes will be a continuation of our existing work,” said Gibney. “However, we’ll also be introducing a number of new processes such as supporting the Government’s pledge to achieve sustainable palm oil within food and other products by 2015, and exploring opportunities for expanding our Labour Standards Assurance System across other contract areas where there are predictors or evidence of labour standards issues within the supply chain, such as direct textiles. Our strategy is not about leaping into the unknown. It’s about taking steps to continually improve by building on our existing achievements to benefit our customers.”

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